Press Release


Title: Commercial/Multifamily Delinquencies Continue Decline in First Quarter
Source:   MBA
Date: 6/3/2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 3, 2014) – Delinquency rates for commercial and multifamily mortgage loans continued to decline in the first quarter of 2014, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association’s (MBA) Commercial/Multifamily Delinquency Report.

During the first quarter of 2014, the 30+ day delinquency rate for loans held in commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) decreased 0.69 percentage points to 6.16 percent.  The 60+ day delinquency rate for multifamily loans held or insured by Fannie Mae was unchanged at 0.10 percent.  The 60+ day delinquency rate for multifamily loans held or insured by Freddie Mac decreased 0.05 percentage points to 0.04 percent.  The 60+ day delinquency rate for commercial and multifamily mortgages held in life company portfolios were unchanged at 0.05 percent.  The 90+ day delinquency rate for loans held by FDIC-insured banks and thrifts decreased 0.13 percentage points to 1.57 percent.

“The last two quarters marked the largest percentage point declines in CMBS delinquency rates ever,” said Jamie Woodwell, MBA’s Vice President of Commercial Real Estate Research.  “We also see continued improvement in the performance of commercial mortgages held by banks and very low delinquencies in loans held by life insurance companies and the GSEs.  With property incomes and values rising, loan performance should continue to benefit.”

The first quarter 2014 delinquency rate for commercial and multifamily mortgages held in life insurance company portfolios was 7.48 percentage points lower than the series high (7.53 percent, reached during the second quarter of 1992).  The delinquency rate for multifamily loans held by Freddie Mac was 6.77 percentage points lower than the series high (6.81 percent, reached in the fourth quarter of 1992).   The delinquency rate for multifamily loans held by Fannie Mae was 3.52 percentage points below the series high (3.62 percent, reached during the fourth quarter of 1991).  The rate for commercial and multifamily mortgages held by banks and thrifts was 5.01 percentage points lower than the series high (6.58 percent, reached in the second quarter of 1991).  The rate for loans held in CMBS was 2.86 percentage points below the series high (9.02 percent, reached in the second quarter of 2011).

Construction and development loans are not included in the numbers presented here, but are included in many regulatory definitions of ‘commercial real estate’ despite the fact they are often backed by single-family residential development projects rather than by office buildings, apartment buildings, shopping centers, or other income-producing properties.  The FDIC delinquency rates for bank and thrift held mortgages reported here do include loans backed by owner-occupied commercial properties.

The MBA analysis looks at commercial/multifamily delinquency rates for five of the largest investor-groups: commercial banks and thrifts, commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS), life insurance companies, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac.  Together these groups hold more than 80 percent of commercial/multifamily mortgage debt outstanding.

The analysis incorporates the same measures used by each individual investor group to track the performance of their loans.  Because each investor group tracks delinquencies in its own way, delinquency rates are not comparable from one group to another.

Based on the unpaid principal balance (UPB) of loans, delinquency rates for each group at the end of the first quarter were as follows:

Life company portfolios: 0.05 percent (60 or more days delinquent);
Freddie Mac: 0.04 percent (60 or more days delinquent);
Fannie Mae: 0.10 percent (60 or more days delinquent);
Banks and thrifts: 1.57 percent (90 or more days delinquent or in non-accrual);
CMBS: 6.16 percent (30 or more days delinquent or in REO).

Differences between the delinquency measures are detailed in Appendix A of the report, which can be viewed here.

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The Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) is the national association representing the real estate finance industry, an industry that employs more than 280,000 people in virtually every community in the country. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the association works to ensure the continued strength of the nation's residential and commercial real estate markets; to expand homeownership and extend access to affordable housing to all Americans. MBA promotes fair and ethical lending practices and fosters professional excellence among real estate finance employees through a wide range of educational programs and a variety of publications. Its membership of over 2,200 companies includes all elements of real estate finance: mortgage companies, mortgage brokers, commercial banks, thrifts, Wall Street conduits, life insurance companies and others in the mortgage lending field. For additional information, visit MBA's Web site:   www.mba.org.